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7 art shows not to miss in Hong Kong this January 2024

By Ashley Siu 5 January 2024

Header image courtesy of Empty Gallery

January is the month of new beginnings, and if you have been hunting for a new hobby to kickstart the year, might we suggest dabbling in the arts? Art has the ability to turn abstract feelings into something tangible, making it the perfect meditative tool for improving self-awareness. For those of you who are not sure where to start, why not consolidate this new year’s resolution with a visit to a local art exhibition? Here are seven art shows in Hong Kong that you do not want to miss this month.

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Photo: Pace Gallery
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“All Walks of Life”

The daily routine that we follow may seem mundane to some, but not to this group of artists on show at Pace Gallery. “All Walks of Life” is an in-depth analysis of personal elements that pervade day-to-day life. Featuring recent works by Anthony Cudahy, Katja Farin, and other talents, immerse yourself in the wide range of contemporary artwork, including Sarah Slappey’s exploration of intertwining body parts, Aubrey Levinthal’s depictions of rhythm among stillness, and Daisy Sheff’s whimsical illustrations. If you are interested in visiting this exhibition, you should hurry: “All Walks of Life” is set to draw its curtains mid-January.

When: Now till 18 January

Where: Pace Gallery, 12/F, H Queen’s, 80 Queen’s Road Central, Central

Photo: Tai Kwun
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“Kongkee: Warring States Cyberpunk”

History comes to life once again when retold with contemporary elements, and this is exactly what renowned animation director Kongkee brings forth in the “Kongkee: Warring States Cyberpunk” exhibition. With the use of immersive installations that integrate animation, sound, and neon art, Kongkee retraces the life of the legendary Chinese poet, Qu Yuan, in a modern setting. This collection of thought-provoking works involves large-scale LED installations, site-specific neon works, and captivating animations. Juxtaposing stereotypical views of history, the ensemble challenges perceptions of the past, and examines the impact of modern technologies.

When: Now till 3 March

Where: Duplex Studio, Police Headquarters, Block 01, Tai Kwun, 10 Hollywood Road, Central

Photo: Tang Contemporary Art
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“The Great Rising Tree”

While we are on the topic of reinterpretation, “The Great Rising Tree” is Xie Xuanxuan’s homage to mythology, folklore, and fairy tales. Showcasing over 20 new works, the exhibition explores the coexistence of mythology and reality through vibrant illustrations of trees, sun legends, reimagined Greek gods, and contemporary female narratives. With a playful touch, Xie’s artworks offer philosophical reflections on the pursuit of connection and the resilience of the human spirit, inviting us to rediscover the wondrous aspects of ordinary existence. “The Great Rising Tree” is only on show until mid-January, so pay a visit while you still can!

When: Now till 16 January

Where: Tang Contemporary Art, 20/F, Landmark South, 39 Yip Kan Street, Wong Chuk Hang

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“Dimensional Civilisation Archaeology Project”

Created by artist Benny To Kai-on, the “Dimensional Civilisation Archaeology Project: The Temple Hidden in Infinite Dimensions” exhibition brings archaeology and technology into the art realm. Inspired by prehistoric and early civilisations, the immersive exhibition combines augmented reality, To’s collection of fictional ceramic artefacts, and a gaming experience. This involves puzzle-solving and exploration, with ancient totems and sculptural figures being reinterpreted using materials from sci-fi anime and films. The passage of time intersects and blurs with the artist’s interpretation of the connections between past, present, and future civilisations.

When: Now till 26 February

Where: 1/F–3/F, Hong Kong Visual Arts Centre, 7A Kennedy Road, Central

Photo: M+
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“Ay-O: Hong Hong Hong”

Influenced by his time in post-WWII Japan and his involvement in the Fluxus art movement in New York City during the 1960s, Japanese artist Ay-O developed a distinct visual style characterised by vibrant rainbow patterns. Dubbed the “Rainbow Artist,” this exhibition is a showcase of Ay-O’s work from the 1950s to the 2000s, alongside selected Fluxus works by his contemporaries. Dive into Ay-O’s rainbow world at “Ay-O: Hong Hong Hong.”

When: Ongoing

Where: Cissy Pui-Lai Pao and Shinichiro Watari Galleries, M+, West Kowloon Cultural District, 38 Museum Drive, Kowloon

Photo: Empty Gallery
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“Back”

We all look back in life, and the easy access to tech nowadays makes reminiscing all the easier. The interplay between technology and human perception is what Doris Guo’s exhibition aims to showcase. Through her immersive installations, Guo delves into the intricate relationship between the physical and the virtual realms. With a focus on sensory engagement, “Back” is a mixture of digital elements and organic materials, a fusion of the tangible and intangible challenging the conventional ways in which we experience art.

When: Now till 17 February

Where: Empty Gallery, 18/F–19/F, Grand Marine Center, 3 Yue Fung Street, Tin Wan

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By Enoch Ngan 4 January 2023
Photo: Perrotin
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“Portraits”

Few of us retain vivid memories of childhood, but some early-year experiences still stick despite the test of time. For artist Otani Workshop, these memories are tactile ones from when he played with clay as a child. During a period of solitude, he was inspired to integrate this experience into his work, infusing his pieces with visions he had to blur the boundaries between art and craft. In “Portraits,” each creation is a manifestation of the belief that the joy he experiences while working with clay can be imparted to others.

When: Now till 17 February

Where: Perrotin, Suite 807, 8/F, K11 Atelier Victoria Dockside, 18 Salisbury Road, Tsim Sha Tsui

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Ashley Siu

Writer

Born and raised in Hong Kong, Ashley has always been captivated by the city and how its bustling heart coexists with flora and fauna. While writing is her passion, you might also find her relaxing with a cosy video game, feeding horses at a local riding school, or checking out climbing gyms in the city.

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